13 janvier 2022

Wébinaire Mickaël Bourgoin

Mickaël Bourgoin got his PhD on dynamo effect and magnetohdrodynamics in Lyon (France, 2003). He spent one year as a postdoc in Cornell University (USA) where he studied several Lagrangian aspects of turbulence, before being appointed as a CNRS researcher at LEGI in Grenoble (France, 2004) to investigate the interactions between inertial particles and turbulence. At present, he is a CNRS research director, in the Physics Laboratory at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, where he carries investigations on fundamental turbulence, particle-laden flows and granular media among other topics. He is also director of the French National Research Network (GDR) « Navier Stokes 2.0 » and teaches advanced fluid mechanics at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon and Ecole Centrale de Lille.
Lagrangian investigation of diffusion and entrainment in a self-similar turbulent jet

Abstract: A fundamental study of a particle-laden free-shear jet is performed in order to investigate its non-stationary Lagrangian dynamics associated to its Eulerian inhomogeneity and the consequences regarding turbulent transport and dispersion properties. The jet is seeded only through the nozzle (inhomogeneous seeding), with tracer particles whose spreading and Lagrangian dynamics is recorded using high-resolution 3D particle tracking, resulting in three components tracks of position, velocity and acceleration of the tracers along the jet. The total measurement volume extends over 50 nozzle diameters downstream, where the jet becomes self-similar.
Several questions are then addressed. First, statistics along particles trajectories are analysed in order to test the relevance of the Lagrangian self-similarity hypothesis, as originally proposed by Batchelor in 1957 to extend Taylor’s 1922 theory of turbulent diffusion to the case of inhomogeneous flows. Second we investigate the role of entrainment on the jet spreading, noting that the Lagrangian flow tagged by the nozzle seeded particles does not contain any contribution from fluid particles entrained into the jet from the quiescent surrounding. This allows us to reinterpret the effect of entrainement as a simple effective compressibility of the tagged fraction of the jet, which can in turn be related to fundamental transport properties such as turbulent diffusivisity and eddy viscosity, for which new simple (and practical) analytical expressions including their spatial inhomogeneity, are derived and validated experimentally.

13 janvier 2022, 16h3017h30
Merci de contacter F. Romano ou J-P Laval pour obtenir le lien

Prochains évènements

Voir l'agenda
08 décembre 2022

Webinaire Fabian Denner

Fabian Denner a obtenu son doctorat à l'Imperial College de Londres en 2013 sur les méthodes numériques pour les écoulements multiphasiques avec tension de surface, suivi d'un post-doc à l'Imperial College. En 2015, Fabian a obtenu une bourse prestigieuse

Fabian Denner a obtenu son doctorat à l'Imperial College de Londres en 2013 sur les méthodes numériques pour les écoulements multiphasiques avec tension de surface, suivi d'un post-doc à l'Imperial College. En 2015, Fabian a obtenu une bourse prestigieuse du Conseil de recherche en ingénierie et en sciences physiques (EPSRC) du Royaume-Uni, avec laquelle il a poursuivi ses travaux fructueux sur les écoulements avec tension de surface et a étendu ses recherches à de nouveaux domaines, tels que les écoulements compressibles et chargés de tensioactifs. Depuis 2018, Fabian est professeur junior de modélisation des écoulements multiphasiques à l'Otto-von-Guericke-Université de Magdebourg (Allemagne). Ses recherches tournent autour du développement de méthodes numériques et d'outils logiciels pour prédire les écoulements multiphasiques, et de l'application de ces méthodes pour répondre aux questions liées à la physique et aux applications de ces écoulements. Actuellement, les travaux de Fabian se concentrent sur les écoulements interfaciaux avec des surfactants, les écoulements viscoélastiques, les écoulements multiphasiques dans les applications biomédicales, ainsi que sur la cavitation et l'acoustique.